Ordinal and Roman Numerals

Ordinal Numerals in Medical Edition

In Dragon Medical, to indicate you want first formatted as 1st, second as 2nd, and third as 3rd, and so on:

  1. On the DragonBar, select Tools > Formatting.
  2. In the Formatting dialog box, click the Numbers, Units, and Dates tab.
  3. Click the check box labeled Write one-digit ordinals from "third" to "ninth" in hybrid form ("3rd" to "9th").
  4. Click OK to save the settings.

Roman numerals

You can dictate Roman numerals by saying "Roman numeral" and the number. For large numbers, say the number in small combinations (as in the examples shown here).

TO ENTER... SAY...
I Roman Numeral one
IV Roman Numeral four
V Roman Numeral five
X Roman Numeral ten
L Roman Numeral fifty
C Roman Numeral one hundred
D Roman Numeral five hundred
M

Roman Numeral one thousand

XXIV Roman Numeral twenty four
XXXI Roman Numeral thirty one
MCMXCVII Roman Numeral one thousand
Roman Numeral nine hundred
Roman Numeral ninety
Roman Numeral seven

 

TIP: Don't pause after the word "Roman Numeral" when you're dictating a Roman numeral. If you pause, Dragon may enter, for example, "Roman numeral three" instead of "III." Roman numerals in Medical Edition

In Dragon Medical, to indicate that you want Roman numerals used for types of diabetes (Type I, Type II):

  1. On the DragonBar, select Tools > Formatting.
  2. In the Formatting dialog box, click the Numbers, Units, and Dates tab.
  3. Click the check box labeled Use roman numerals for diabetes types.
  4. Click OK to save the settings.


If the denominator (bottom number in the fraction) is greater than 10, you can enter the fraction by saying "slash" or "over" between the two numbers.

TO ENTER... SAY...
9/12 nine [slash] twelve or nine over twelve
5 3/56 five [space bar] three [slash] fifty six
130/70 one thirty over seventy


A few common fractions can also be displayed on your computer as special characters (such as 1/4, 1/2, or 3/4) instead of two numbers separated by a slash character (such as 1/4, 1/2, or 3/4). For information about dictating fraction characters, see Dictating uncommon special characters on page 115.