Success story—The impact of clinical speech recognition in the Emergency Department

The impact of clinical speech recognition in the Emergency Department

Ignetica Success Story

Results of a study at an NHS Foundation Trust.

This report summarises the results of a study into the impact of Nuance Dragon Medical speech recognition deployed within the Emergency Department (ED) at an NHS Foundation Trust as reported by ED clinicians responding to an in-depth structured questionnaire. It provides learnings and recommendations for other healthcare leaders who may be investigating similar digital solutions to create complete, accurate and timely patient records.

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Speech recognition has transformed our ED, releasing our doctors and nurses from the shackles of clinical documentation and enabling them to spend more time treating patients.

— ED Consultant and CCIO

Results
  • Nuance Dragon Medical speech recognition integrated into the EPR has enabled and accelerated real-time, paperless clinical documentation within the Emergency Department.
  • Nuance Dragon Medical speech recognition has significantly reduced the burden of clinical documentation within the Emergency Department.
  • The benefits of speech recognition are clear, but dedicated training must be in place to drive change on the ground.

Background

As earlier studies have identified, hand-writing or self typing reports is widespread across NHS Trusts. This practice was also evident within ED prior to deploying the departmental EPR. For example, 95% of its Main department clinical team were either hand-typing or using pen and paper to create their patient records. See & Treat saw 53% of the clinical team relying on hand-writing and typing and 28% relying on traditional dictation using secretaries and support staff. For those working when dictation or audio typing was used, 32% of clinicians cited delays of one or two days in notes reaching patient records following consultations. 28% reported that this process typically took 2-6 days. Some clinicians – 9% – reported that notes took more than two weeks to reach clinical records – such that they could not be used in the ongoing treatment of the patient by other clinicians. Following implementation of the EPR it was anticipated that many clinicians, limited to typing notes directly into the EPR, would struggle to adopt the technology.

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